2013-reigando-01

Kendo Places #1: Reigando 霊巌洞

I’d like to start the first in a series of short articles entitled “Kendo Places” by writing about a place that all kendo enthusiasts should visit at least once in their life and that is connected with one of the most famous swordsmen in Japanese history: REIGANDO.

Reigando (霊巌洞) is basically a small cave in the mountains close to Kumamoto city. It is on the grounds of the very old Unganzenji temple (雲巌禅寺), and it was here, in this cave, where Miyamoto Musashi was said to have written his treatise the Go Rin no Sho (五輪書) in the early 1640’s.

Myself, my friend, and my sempai and his family travelled there by car early one morning back in 2004. It was a cold morning and we were a bit hungover. I revisited the cave in 2013 and have added some pics from that visit here.

After a good 30 mins or so drive from Kumamoto we arrived at the area, only to be greeted by a big white Musashi statue. The year-long NHG Samurai-drama had been “Musashi” in 2003 and during that year there had been a Musashi-boom. Anywhere even remotely associated with Musashi got an overhaul and loads of new products flooded the market. This gleaming statue was evidence of that.

2007-reigando-05

Heading down from the carpark we arrived at Unganzenji temple. Its very small and had a tiny showcase area of Musashi-related treasure, such as clothes and bokuto said to be used by him.

Going through that there is what is the most impressive thing to be seen at the area: the Gohyakurakan (五百羅漢). This is a small hillside with 500 small jizo statues sitting in various postures (and in various states). Its quite eerie to look at, and it must be quite scary in the evenings!

Passing through there and you reach the steps to the cave itself. We all went up there and we hung around seeing if we could get some inspiration… perhaps our kendo would become better due to visiting the place? The flyer (pictured above) had an image of Musashi sitting on the big rock outside the cave contemplating… so we promptly did the same thing!!!!

2004-reigando-03

The popularity of Musashi inside and outside of Japan is undisputed. What we concretely know about his life is very little and subject to academic study and close scrutiny. Did Musashi even write the Gorinnosho is a question that cannot be answered. That he lived, and that parts of his tale did actually happen (though probably not the way they are said to have… the fight with Sasaki Kojiro at Ganryujima is an example of that) seem to be enough to fascinate people in this man. if you are interested in him and wish to tread in his steps, then I recommend that you pay a visit to Reigando. Its off the normal tourist routes and its a bit hard to get to, but if you are even slightly interested in studying a bit more about the history of kendo, I strongly recommend that you take the time out to visit this place.

After soaking in the atmosphere for a bit longer we headed back into Kumamoto and finished our Musashi-day with a trip to Kumamoto castle. All in all, a good day was had.


Gallery

Some snaps from my first visit in 2004 and another in 2013.


Information

Yahoo Map: here (Japanese)
Address: Kumamoto-ken, Kumamoto-shi, Matsuo-cho, Iwato 589
Phone number: 096-329-8854.
Access: There is very limited bus access, so please go by car (call for directions).
Times: 8am-5pm.
Cost: Parking is free, but it costs adult 200 yen, and children 100 yen to get in.

Links
* Flickr “reigando” tagged photos.
* Unganzenji and Reigando (Japanese)


Other places in the series will include Ganryujima, Yagyuzato, Kashima Jingu, etc etc. Watch this space. Contributions accepted.

Published by

George

I'm the founder and chief editor of kenshi247.net. Amongst other things I am a high school kendo club coach, an avid practitioner of classical swordsmanship, a history student, and a vegetarian.

4 thoughts on “Kendo Places #1: Reigando 霊巌洞

  1. Why do these guys always go to caves to contemplate life. Can’t they find a nice spot under a tree somewhere?
    I haven’t been to Kumamoto yet but when I go I’d like to visit.

  2. Newton found a nice spot under a tree and got hit on the head. Just goes to show the effects of kendo can be felt anywhere.

  3. The gohyakurakan aren’t actually Jizo, they are what are known as ‘arhats,’ or arakan (阿羅漢) in Japanese. They are the 500 followers of the buddha who were present at the sermon at vulture peak and became enlightened thereafter.

    Reigando is a lovely place, I’d highly recommend it. I have been there on two occasions and there was not a sould around. The big white Musashi statue at the entrance is an eyesore though.

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